Southern Phrases That Others Need A Dictionary For

Southern America is known for a plethora of unique cultural aspects. There’s the homestyle cuisine, love for football, and the slang that makes you wonder if they’re speaking another language. There’s a ton of southern phrases over yonder that the folks from states like Mississippi, Alabama, and Georgia seamlessly embed into their diction. East coast and west coast citizens might have a hard time deciphering what these words mean when they hear them. No worries, go through and teach yourself these phrases from the south and you’ll be an expert in no time.

“Aren’t You Precious”

blonde staring
Harry Benson/Getty Images
Harry Benson/Getty Images

Another characteristic that’s prominent in the south is hospitality. Southerners love being polite and will disguise insults as compliments. Keep this in mind for whenever you hear “aren’t you precious,” because it could be loaded with sarcasm.

They’ll usually say it after a person has done something questionable or if they’ve been offended. You’ll rarely hear it relayed with the conventional connotation that people everywhere else are accustomed to. Did you just call someone dumb? Well, aren’t you precious?

“Reckon”

reckon southern phrase
deves/Instagram
deves/Instagram

We reckon it’s time to teach you about this word. If you’re having a conversation with someone and you give your thoughts and opinions, then chances are that other person will chime in.

That’s when they kick off their spiel with “I reckon.” In most cases, this southern word substitutes in place of I believe, imagine, suppose, and think. We reckon that these southern phrases aren’t too hard to understand, wouldn’t you agree? Reckon also becomes catchy once you start using it.

“Over Yonder”

pointing at something
Keith Hamshere/Getty Images
Keith Hamshere/Getty Images

What’s that over there? Over where? Over yonder! If you’re visiting in the south and ask for directions, someone might use the phrase “over yonder.” The word yonder might be a phrase you aren’t used to, but used in the correct context and it isn’t tough to decipher.

Bottom line, it translates to over there. A friendly point might be attached to the phrase to aid in which direction “yonder” is, so don’t be too baffled if you hear this.

“See To Christmas”

skirt
blondshopaholic/Instagram
blondshopaholic/Instagram

You’d have to some type of supervision to be able to see to Christmas. Luckily, that’s not what this phrase means. If you’re a woman and you go to a family event wearing a skirt that might be a little short, then chances are you might hear this slang.

You think your outfit is perfectly fine until your grandmother sees it. That’s when she flares her nostrils, slightly offended at the length of your skirt, and says she can “see to Christmas!” All it means is that your garment might be a little too revealing.

“Sweating More Than A Sinner In Church”

sweating in church
Oliver Berg/picture alliance via Getty Images
Oliver Berg/picture alliance via Getty Images

Sometimes, the sun can be rude to the inhabitants of Earth. We didn’t ask for it to feel like we’re slowly descending into the pit of an active volcano. Maybe the air conditioner just broke, and it’s the hottest day of the summer, and you’re stuck inside.

In any of those scenarios, you will be sweating more than a sinner in church. That’s a southern phrase that implies those who do no good feel the heat when they go to church.

“Pretty As A Peach”

pretty as a peach southern phrase
di-vo/Instagram
di-vo/Instagram

Sometimes a woman might look dashing to the eye, and you wish to compliment her. Sure, a simple “you look nice” or “how beautiful” can suffice, but in the south, there’s a different phrase.

Southerners will tell her she looks pretty as a peach. It’s not to be taken in the literal sense, it’s just a short and sweet way of saying a girl how nice she looks. Ladies, next time you frequent the south, don’t be alarmed.

“Hissy Fit”

young baby screaming
Tim Graham/Getty Images
Tim Graham/Getty Images

This phrase might be more on the universal side, but you hear it more in the south. If you’ve ever seen a young kid throw a temper tantrum after they’ve been denied that piece of candy, then you know how wild he or she can get.

That would be a prime example of a hissy fit. It’s a handy phrase, and as we said, it’s spread beyond the diction of southerners. Folks on the west, east and everywhere in between use it as well.

“Fixin’ To”

fixin to slang
starlitstarseed/Instagram
starlitstarseed/Instagram

Has anyone ever told you to do something that you already planned on doing? It happens all the time, and southerners have a neat phrase to use a response. It’s simple and only two words: fixin’ to.

“Hey, what are you about to do?” “Well, I’m fixin’ to do the dishes then go for a six-mile run.” See, there’s nothing to it. Unless you’re really fixin’ to “fix” something, this usually just means you’re about to do something.

“Too Big For Your Britches”

too big for them
WILLIAM WEST/AFP/Getty Images
WILLIAM WEST/AFP/Getty Images

Southerners typically call their undergarments and pants britches. If you hear the phrase, you’re too big for your britches, that doesn’t mean you’re overweight at all (unless the person is disrespectful). Instead, it means someone might be getting ahead of themselves.

Being too big for your britches indicates that you think too highly of yourself. For example, challenging what your parents say when you’re young will make you too big for your britches, and you might be disciplined.

“Full As A Tick”

full as a tick eating food
kihiyass/Instagram
kihiyass/Instagram

We all know that feeling of getting too full after eating a delicious meal. You feel it even more if it’s a homecooked meal, because who cooks better than your parents? Your belly is on the verge of blowing up, so what do you say?

You utter the words “I’m full as a tick.” If you don’t live in tick county, after they enjoy a healthy dose of blood, they can quickly balloon up. It might not be the most inviting thing to visualize, but it’s accurate.

“Hold Your Horses”

bella-hadid.0
ghostinkyrie/Twitter
ghostinkyrie/Twitter

Hold your horses! That doesn’t mean to go to your barn and grab hold of your precious animal. This is another common phrase that might not throw you off guard, and it simple to grasp.

If you ever hear this slang, someone is trying to tell you to simmer down and wait. Sometimes, people can get anxious and become impatient, simply ask them to hold their horses and hopefully, they’ll listen to your kind request.

“If The Creek Don’t Rise”

if the creek don't rise
Dan Porges/Getty Images
Dan Porges/Getty Images

Having a busy life can put a damper on your social plans. People might invite you places, and no matter how badly you want to go, you can’t guarantee your appearance. Southerners have the perfect phrase for this situation.

Take these older gentlemen you see in the picture. Say they meet every Tuesday at the same time, but one of them wishes to do something else on the upcoming Thursday. The other might have plans that night with his nephew, but it isn’t in stone yet. That’s when he’ll say, “Well, Jim, if the creek don’t rise, I’ll be there.” It’s just slang for we’ll see what I can do, but no guarantees.

“Yankee”

yankee slang
tristen_sierra_realtor/Instagram
tristen_sierra_realtor/Instagram

If you aren’t from the south, then there’s a chance someone from there might throw this term at you. You don’t have to enjoy baseball or even be a fan of the Yankee’s to earn this title.

If someone calls you a Yankee, it merely means they assume you’re from the north, or you act like it. Yankee became popular in the south during the Civil War as a means to refer to Union soldiers.

“Being Ugly”

you should stop
ghostinkyrie/Twitter
ghostinkyrie/Twitter

Don’t worry, you’re not unattractive. Southerners just have a way with words and will tell you that you’re being ugly if you’re acting unacceptably. Similar to when you get hungry, and you start to have an attitude with people, that’s when you’re being ugly.

If you want to adopt this phrase, be careful who you use it with and around whom. Folks might start to think you’re calling people rough, when all you want them to do is switch up their attitude.

“Barking Up The Wrong Tree”

barking up the wrong tree phrase
hunterthehunk_fieldspaniel/Instagram
hunterthehunk_fieldspaniel/Instagram

You’ve probably heard this phrase before but didn’t know it originates from the south. People put themselves in situations that have them barking up the wrong tree all the time. Most of the time, you don’t even recognize it until someone else tells you.

Generally, you’re barking up the wrong tree when you speak on a matter you’re not too versed in or if you assume the wrong thing. “If you think I’m going to give you $100, then you’re barking up the wrong tree.”

“Cattywampus”

what is a cattywampus
kafka.the.kat/Instagram
kafka.the.kat/Instagram

When you first read this word and hear it, you might be thinking it’s ridiculous. The more you say it, however, you’ll want to indulge it even more because it sounds so fun.

Cattywampus has nothing to do with cats. It means that something is sideways or out of sorts. If you have a painting in your living room and it tilts a little to the right, a southerner will say that it’s quite cattywampus and that you should straighten it.

“Till The Cows Come Home”

grazing in the field
Tim Graham/Getty Images
Tim Graham/Getty Images

You might not own a farm, but the phrase till the cows come home can still apply to you. If someone you know who usually takes a long time tells you he or she will be right back, deep down, you know that’s not the case.

You’ll be waiting till the cows come home for that person. The southern phrase implies that your wait time won’t be short and that you should be prepared to do something else in the meantime.

“No Bigger Than A Minnow In A Fishing Pond”

no bigger than a minnow in a fishing pond
robert__rp/Instagram
robert__rp/Instagram

Southerners like using their metaphors and euphemisms! This phrase is pretty straight forward but might cause some confusion. If you’re telling a story and you need to describe something small, what would you say?

If you’re from the south, then you’re going to say it was no bigger than a minnow in a fishing pond. The goal when fishing is to get something of decent size, but sometimes you reel in some of those minnows that pale in comparison to the bass.

“Three Sheets To The Wind”

three sheets to the wind
caake.tinn/Instagram
caake.tinn/Instagram

If you’ve gotten drunk before, then more than likely this phrase can be applied to you. When you’ve had one too many drinks, but you swear to your friends that you’ll be fine, they might not agree.

In the back of their minds, they might be thinking you’re three sheets to the wind. Ten minutes later and you’re standing on the bar asking for the bartender’s number. You’ve for sure had too much to alcohol and the phrase three sheets to the wind certainly applies.

“Madder Than A Wet Hen”

serena is mad
Michael Owens/Getty Images
Michael Owens/Getty Images

We’ve never encountered a wet hen, but this slang term has nothing to do with them. If you hear that a woman is “madder than a wet hen,” you shouldn’t press any of her buttons. There’s no telling what she’s capable of doing when enraged.

Remember, “hell has no fury like a woman scorned.” If you can remember that, then you will be comfortable remembering what the southern phrase madder than a wet hen means.

“A Mind To”

southern-phrases-01
Instagram/annies.saving.grace
Instagram/annies.saving.grace

If you’re thinking in your head about what you’re going to do next, planning… contemplating… there’s a certain term for that in the south. Can you think about what it might be? You definitely don’t hear this one in other parts of the country.

If you’re thinking about something, you have “a mind to” do it. So you might say, “I have a mind to go over to Tom’s house to help him work on his car, but I’m not sure when.”

“Piddle”

southern-phrases-02
Instagram/vintageporcelain
Instagram/vintageporcelain

What in the world do you think “piddle” means? For Southern folks, it means that you’re being lazy or procrastinating at a task. We’re sure that you have more than a friend or two who “piddles” around, right? It can also mean wasting something.

To use it in a sentence, you could say, “Would you stop piddling around back there and get it done?” Or even, “Jane was going to come out tonight but she piddled away all her money before Friday.”

“Happy As A Pig In Mud”

southern-phrases-03
Instagram/feminist_wizard
Instagram/feminist_wizard

Are pigs happy when they’re in mud? This is something that city folks certainly know nothing about. When was the last time most West Coasters even saw a pig? Probably at the County Fair. For those who don’t know, yes, pigs are very happy when they are in mud.

So if you were to say, “Jimmy is as happy as a pig in mud at college” that means that Jimmy is very happy that he chose to go away to college.

“Dog Won’t Hunt”

southern-phrases-04
Instagram/ona.weimaraner
Instagram/ona.weimaraner

Even if you’re not a hunter, you might be able to figure out what this Southern phrase means. “Dog won’t hunt” literally means that the dog won’t do his job to go hunting with his owner to find raccoons, birds, or other small animals.

As a Southern phrase, “dog won’t hunt” basically means “that won’t work.” This can be used as a response when someone provides an idea that you know won’t get you anywhere.

“Preaching To The Choir”

southern-phrases-05
Instagram/southernbellebourbon
Instagram/southernbellebourbon

Okay, c’mon now. you know this one, right? “Preaching to the choir” is one of the more well-known, common phrases from the South that’s been adopted by people who live across the country.

It simply means that you’re arguing a point, or telling someone something that they already believe. If you say, “the rent is too high!” to your roommate, who also believes that the rent is too high, and has already told you this, well then, you’re preaching to the choir.

“If I Had My Druthers”

southern-phrases-06
Instagram/realchrisledford
Instagram/realchrisledford

This Southern phrase originated from a 1950s Broadway musical depicting Southern life, called Li’l Abner. In the musical, poking fun at the lifestyle of the rural South, they used the phrase “If I had my druthers…”

This phrase basically means “If i had my way…” so you would say “If I had my druthers, this party would be over by nine and I’d be in bed by 10.” You likely won’t hear this phrase as commonly as some of the others on this list!

“All Get Out”

southern-phrases-07
Instagram/jrw3artist
Instagram/jrw3artist

“All get out” is a Southern phrase that means something along the lines of the most extreme example, the ultimate. It’s a phrase that you can use throughout the day in a lot of instances, though, so you might want to adopt this one!

You could say, “I’m hungry as all get out.” Or, “that concert was as good as all get out.” You’re basically saying that whatever it is, it’s the maximum.

“Gumption”

southern-phrases-10
Instagram/williamslarkecasey
Instagram/williamslarkecasey

You’ve heard this one before, right? “Gumption” is a word that’s been carried over and used by many people, but it originated from the South. If someone tells you that you have gumption, it means that they think you are bold and courageous.

This isn’t used in a negative way, as if you foolishly carried out something with bravado, but rather a compliment, that someone admires your bravery. Add this one to your vocab!

“I Declare”

southern-phrases-09
Instagram/crawfishcave
Instagram/crawfishcave

“I declare” is a phrase that you would insert at the beginning of a sentence. You can basically use it in any sentence, but when you do, it means that you strongly believe whatever you follow it up with.

So if you say, “I do declare, it is hot today!” You’re saying it’s really hot. Or if you say, “I do declare, this is some good chicken you cooked” you’re giving a compliment, saying this is really good chicken.

“Living In High Cotton”

southern-phrases-08
Instagram/clipsch1
Instagram/clipsch1

Most know that the cotton industry started in the South and is embedded in the roots of Southern culture. There are plenty of cotton fields in the South, and Southerners know that the higher the cotton bush is, the more cotton it will produce, and hence, more money.

So if someone says they’re “living in high cotton” it means that they are feeling financially secure, or wealthy. If you moved and got a new job you could tell your friends you’re “living in high cotton now.”

“Hush Your Mouth”

your mouth
William Lovelace/Daily Express/Hulton Archive/Getty Images
William Lovelace/Daily Express/Hulton Archive/Getty Images

This one is quite straightforward and you’ve probably said it more than once. Whenever someone gets on your nerves or continuously speaks, just tell them to hush their mouth. There are many variants of this too, like put a sock in it or close your lips.

This particular way of phrasing it is the southern way, but you more than likely heard it elsewhere. If you grew up in the south, then you know to hush your mouth when your parents are talking to you.

“Cat On A Hot Tin Roof”

cat
Chris Moorhouse/Evening Standard/Getty Images
Chris Moorhouse/Evening Standard/Getty Images

We don’t know about you, but we’re under the impression that southerners like adding animals into their metaphors. “Cat on a hot tin roof” follows the mold and has an interesting definition.

If someone says anything that suggests a person was like a cat on a hot tin roof, then they’re saying that person was acting anxious and sketchy. Think about what the literal phrase would look like and you can imagine this way better in your mind.

“Stompin’ Grounds”

nola
Erika Goldring/Getty Images
Erika Goldring/Getty Images

If you had to take a guess not knowing what this phrase meant, you might get it correct. It’s pretty much translates to what it’s saying. Stompin’ grounds is what you call the place you consider home.

If you leave your hometown for college or a new job and return, then you’re going back to your old stompin’ grounds. That’s what they say in the south whereas other areas might say the old neighborhood or just “hood.”

“Can’t Make A Silk Purse Out Of A Sow’s Ear”

shopping
Joe Amon/The Denver Post via Getty Images
Joe Amon/The Denver Post via Getty Images

Once again, here’s another reference to an animal, but this time its a pig. Southerners aren’t referring to a female pig when they use this phrase at all. They’re merely saying it as an insult.

If you get told this, someone is taking a jab at your cheap taste. If you don’t know how to dress or always wear tacky clothes, you will be the poster child for this saying. People can be so mean sometimes.

“You Can’t Carry A Tune In A Bucket”

kiss fm
Raymond Boyd/Getty Images
Raymond Boyd/Getty Images

We apologize in advance if you’ve ever been told this phrase. Perhaps someone said it in passing and you didn’t know what it meant. Well, take a deep breath. You can’t carry a tune in a bucket stands for “you can’t sing.”

It’s that simple. Not even a bucket can you sound good. That’s got to be pretty bad because the acoustics in a bucket make for a great singing voice on anyone. Don’t let this be you.

“There’s More Than One Way To Skin A Cat”

small kitten in bowl
JOHANNES EISELE/AFP/Getty Images
JOHANNES EISELE/AFP/Getty Images

No, there isn’t anyone out there testing multiple ways to skin a cat. Southerners just like using animals in their phrases. This slang term is more about functionality than anything else.

When you hear this term, it means that there has to be another way to get something done. Tired of eating cereal that gets soggy so fast? Add the milk first, then the cereal, and enjoy your breakfast food longer without the soggy mess.

“God Don’t Like Ugly”

looking
Mark Ganzon/Getty Images for Fenty Beauty
Mark Ganzon/Getty Images for Fenty Beauty

This is as southern as it gets. Remember, to refrain from “being ugly” you have to always keep in mind that “God don’t like ugly.” All this means is that acting in an unwanted manner isn’t welcomed.

Don’t be rude or mean if there isn’t a reason to. Stay positive and keep away from negativity. There’s no reason for you be ugly if you focus on the good. Shift your mindset toward optimism and you’ll never have to worry about hearing this phrase.

“Cuttin’ A Rug”

obama dancing
NICHOLAS KAMM/AFP/Getty Images
NICHOLAS KAMM/AFP/Getty Images

You don’t need a pair of scissors or a knife for this term. All you’ll need is the ability to move to the music. Cuttin’ a rug means to dance.

“Let’s go out tonight!” “What do you want to do?” “Duh, let’s cut a rug!” That could be an example of how one might use this phrase in real life. If you see two people moving their feet in an applaudable manner then you might say to yourself, “wow, they’re cuttin’ a rug!”

“Whatever Floats Your Boat”

lindsey vonn shrugging
Noel Vasquez/Getty Images
Noel Vasquez/Getty Images

Have you ever found yourself in a position where you need to give your input, but you aren’t too sure? Sure, you can shrug your way out of it, but you want to take the southern way out, we know what you can say.

One can always resort to using the slang term, whatever floats your boat. It’s effective because it tells the receiving end that they can do whatever they wish and they don’t need outside approval.

“Pot Calling The Kettle Black”

pointing
imgur
imgur

You don’t ever want to be the person getting this phrase thrown at you. It just isn’t right. Pot calling the kettle black is one guilty person accusing someone else of the same thing they’re guilty of.

That isn’t how you want to live your life. Perhaps as a joke this would be fine, but if it’s a legit accusation, then you should have kept your mouth on hush. Worry about yourself first before you go pointing fingers.