The Most Popular Slang Terms From Your Birth Year

Slang is a lot like fashion. The two change with the times. You might have a fashionable dress in 2019, but in 2020 it can look completely dated. The same applies to the words and phrases that our culture creates. Saying something is “da bomb” today is utterly passé. The young folks now say something along the lines of “that’s fire.” Do you recall what slang words were popular while you were growing up? For example, the word “hyper” didn’t come into general use until 1942. Read on to discover which years some of the most popular slang terms originated.

1950 – Beautiful People

American women's swimming champion and actress Esther Williams
Mondadori Portfolio by Getty Images
Mondadori Portfolio by Getty Images

One might not have ever imagined that the term “beautiful people” was ever slang. It seems like such a simple phrase that people have been saying since the conception of the word beautiful.

In the’50s it was Hollywood lingo that converted to the mainstream. You used it talk about those in the industry who were successful and gorgeous. These days, this “slang” can be applied to anyone and isn’t exclusive to a group of specific individuals.

1951 – Nerd

is this a nerd?
H. Armstrong Roberts/ClassicStock/Getty Images
H. Armstrong Roberts/ClassicStock/Getty Images

You’re such a nerd! Ouch, disparagingly using that word can be labeled as bullying these days and even in the ’50s. In 1951, Newsweek cited nerd and defined it as an alternative to the phrase “square.”

Anyone who doesn’t have a high enough confidence level might find square or nerd as demeaning. On the other hand, an individual could see it as a compliment due to the connotation behind it. What it really boils down to is that you’re smart and you take an interest in things like comic books, math, and knowledge.

1952 – Divey (Dive Bar)

a look at at divey bar
marshallsbar_dc/Instagram
marshallsbar_dc/Instagram

You and your friends probably use the term “dive bar,” but probably don’t know when it originated. Up until 1952, how would one describe a bar that wasn’t the nicest, but it got the job done?

In an article from The New Yorker, a writer used the term “divey,” and since then, it’s become a staple for night goers. Dive bars might not be the prettiest, but they are certainly a popular destination.

1953 – Hippie

the term hippie
In Pictures Ltd./Corbis via Getty Images
In Pictures Ltd./Corbis via Getty Images

We now have the modern version of the word hippie, hipster, but what’s the origin of the word? Hippies might have ruled second half of the ’60s, but the slang term predates then.

If you wore exotic clothing (or not much) and you were fond of hallucinogenics, then you would classify as a hippie. We’ve brought back the term, but in a new way with hipster. It’s just a modern version of the word.

1954 – Boonies

babes in the woods
Fox Photos/Hulton Archive/Getty Images
Fox Photos/Hulton Archive/Getty Images

Has anyone ever told you that you live in the boonies? This isn’t anything to take offense at, it just means that you live far away from the city. Some might enjoy living in the boonies more than others.

It’s said that this term originated in New Hampshire. Places like the woods are considered the boonies as long as they’re in the middle of nowhere. Be careful when you’re out in the boonies, because you never know what’s lurking there.

1955 – Cool

james dean the king of cool
contributor/Getty Images
contributor/Getty Images

Are you cool enough to know that this term came about in 1955? It seems like so long ago, but now, you hear cool almost every day. You can sprinkle the word into plenty of conversations.

“Boy, that’s a cool shirt you’ve got there, pal.” It isn’t strictly to describe temperatures. Mad Magazine‘s slang round-up of the year wasn’t the first time the masses became exposed to this word, but they started using it a lot more afterward.

1956 – Nit-Picker

man with newspaper thinking
William Gottlieb/CORBIS/Corbis via Getty Images
William Gottlieb/CORBIS/Corbis via Getty Images

Aren’t nit-pickers your favorite type of people? Up until 1956, there wasn’t an efficient way to describe the folks that can’t ever let things go. Go ahead and call them nit-pickers.

Significant others can be some of the worst types of nit-pickers. You might think an argument or heated discussion is over, but they have to add a sly comment about how you never close the toothpaste cap completely. That’s what you call grade A nit-picking.

1958 – Nuke

the birth of the word nuke
Galerie Bilderwelt/Getty Images
Galerie Bilderwelt/Getty Images

The first nuclear bomb to go off was in a remote desert near Alamogordo, New Mexico, and it happened in 1945. One might think the word “nuke” would have originated at that time, but one would be wrong.

1958 was a very active year for nuclear testing. There were so many bombs being tested that a shortened term rose from the ashes and changed the way we talk about this dangerous activity.

1959 – Hot-Dog

catching some waves
Keystone/Getty Images
Keystone/Getty Images

No, this isn’t the processed meat that Americans love to devour on the 4th of July. The other way to use hot-dog is to describe someone who is showing off. The term comes from ’50s California surf culture.

If someone is riding a wave and they’re displaying a lot of cockiness, they’re a hot-dog, plain and simple. Today, the term still gets tossed around. “That dude over there is hot-doggin’ it up today, look out everyone!”

1961 – Bratty

brat hanging from the ceiling
Contributor/Getty Images
Contributor/Getty Images

Baby boomers were growing into teenagers and older kids during the ’60s. How entitled were they for the term “bratty” come around in 1961? Brat mostly carries a negative connotation, so they might have been pretty bad.

One publication described this word as “always appropriate” during this era. Ouch, that has to sting a little bit. There are brats spread across each generation, so baby boomers can’t take all the blame for that. Wait until Gen-Zers start to grow up.

1962 – Drop-Dead

woman looking
Jack Robinson/Hulton Archive/Getty Images
Jack Robinson/Hulton Archive/Getty Images

Similar to “beautiful people,” it doesn’t seem possible that the phrase “drop-dead” was something new so long ago. It feels like it’s been a part of the English language for ages.

The phrase came from the fashion industry and was used to describe anything gorgeous or fabulous. It’s a pretty high-level compliment these days, so if you want to make someone feel special, you should consider giving it a whirl and see what happens.

1963 – Mickey Mouse

couple on the beach
Richard C. Miller/Donaldson Collection/Getty Images
Richard C. Miller/Donaldson Collection/Getty Images

No, this isn’t about the fun-loving character from Disney that kids adore. That would be the pronoun, but we’re talking about something different that came from the military in 1963.

To “Mickey Mouse” meant to goof around. It makes sense because military men get cooped up in ships for months at a time. Things can get boring so what better way to have to some fun than to Mickey Mouse? It’s an excellent way to blow off some steam.

1964 – Aw-Shucks

woman smiling
David Turnley/Corbis/VCG via Getty Images
David Turnley/Corbis/VCG via Getty Images

Have you ever seen the show Family Matters with super-nerd Steve Urkle? Remember when he would do something egregious and when confronted, he’d simply say “did I do that?” That’s the same thing as aw-shucks.

When someone uses this phrase, they are usually feigning innocence. The writer Tom Wolfe is who we have to thank for this beautiful expression. It can be used in almost any situation, and can help get you out of messy circumstances.

1947 – Artsy

looking at a plane
Universal/Getty Images
Universal/Getty Images

If you’re reading this, you’ve probably more than likely used the term artsy. With so many Millenials and Gen-Zers interested in the arts, it’s easy to label them as artsy. The word offers a quick and straightforward fix.

Costume designer Edith Head coined this cultural gem. She was ahead of her time when it came to design, so if anyone wished to imitate her, they would have to fall in the artsy category.

1945 – D’oh!

homer simpson
FOX via Getty Images
FOX via Getty Images

Long before the animated icon Homer Simpson screamed the word, “D’oh!” spilled from people’s mouths in the ’40s. This phrase is on the catchy side, so say it once, and you might be using it for a while.

D’oh! has its roots in radio programs. We have the BBC program “It’s That Man Again” to thank for introducing the phrase to us, although it didn’t appear in in the Oxford English Dictionary until 2001.

1943 – Duh

looking out the window
Hulton Archive/Getty Images
Hulton Archive/Getty Images

Sometimes you might find yourself dealing with an exasperating person, and all you can say is “duh.” We commonly associate this expression with the ’90s, but it predates that by decades. In fact, this now-common term didn’t come around until 1943.

The source was a “Merrie Melodies” cartoon, according to records. We can definitely imagine that, as the term sounds like something Daffy Duck would frequently use when dealing with foolish characters.

1949 – Jet Set

the best
Slim Aarons/Hulton Archive/Getty Images
Slim Aarons/Hulton Archive/Getty Images

Today, we might call these individuals “influencers,” the people you see on social media who travel all over the world, living like kings and queens in the most lavish of settings. In 1949, these people would have been called “jet setters”.

The word jet set first appeared to describe wealthy people who lived fast and glamorously. It was, and still is, a lifestyle that many wish they could have.

1969 – Out Of Sight

man doing the splits
Chris Moorhouse/Evening Standard/Getty Images
Chris Moorhouse/Evening Standard/Getty Images

In 1969, if you were “out of sight,” it didn’t mean that you literally couldn’t be seen. Being out of sight was a pretty good compliment to receive, so it’s a shame that no one uses it that much anymore.

Something that is out of sight is beyond belief. Did someone just arrive at the party wearing an outstanding outfit? You could say that their ensemble is out of sight because you can’t believe they put something so aesthetically pleasing together.

1970 – Dorky

man at the chalkboard
H. Armstrong Roberts/ClassicStock/Getty Images
H. Armstrong Roberts/ClassicStock/Getty Images

“Dorky” is a term that never really died down. Today, it’s used in the vocabulary of both older and younger generations. Don’t get the word “dorky” confused with “nerdy,” though.

Dictionary.com defines dorky as “stupid, inept, or unfashionable,” while the word nerd describes “an intelligent but single-minded person obsessed with a nonsocial hobby or pursuit. A nerd can also be “a person considered to be socially awkward, boring, unstylish, etc.”

1978 – Pig Out

ordering food -51071593
Tim Boyle/Getty Images
Tim Boyle/Getty Images

Who hasn’t done it? We’ve all fallen victim to gluttony once or twice in our lives. Up until 1978, you could have called it whatever you wanted, but now you’re “pigging out” when you consume a lot of food.

Records have the Washington Post using the phrase as it told people that it’s okay to devour a large amount of food. “In food, a moderate diet is always right, yet once in a great while a pig-out is desirable.” That’s probably not something you’d read today.

1941: Dreamboat

1941: Dreamboat
Archive Photos/Getty Images
Archive Photos/Getty Images

In 1941, a phrase that was taken from Hollywood was “dreamboat.” And when we say it was taken from Hollywood, we mean that people would use the slang word in reference to one person in particular: any good looking actor, such as Cary Grant.

The 1940s were part of the classic age of Hollywood cinema, and it many attractive actors who looked way too good in a three-piece suit. Talents such as Grant, Humphrey Bogart, and even James Stewart were considered dreamboats back in the day!

1942: Hyper

1942: Hyper
Bettmann/Getty Images
Bettmann/Getty Images

Depending on the context, the word “hyper” nowadays can very well be taken out of context, especially if its in reference to a child or even a family pet. But, in 1942, when the slang word first became popular, it meant nothing other than someone who had a whole lot of extra energy.

Shortened for “hyperactive,” the word hyper wasn’t meant to insult a person, but rather to tell them that they were very energetic and might have way too much energy for the type of vibe you’re going for.

1967: Freak Flag

1967: Freak Flag
David Redfern/Redferns
David Redfern/Redferns

We’re not even sure what it was called beforehand, but in 1967 the one and only Jimi Hendrix introduced the phrase “freak flag” to the world. his introduction to the awesome phrase was telling people to let their’s fly high, loud, and proud.

Pretty much, he was telling people to be themselves and to not think for one second apologizing for it is in the cards. The 60s was a time everyone was letting their freak flag fly! We could all take a page out of Hendrix’s book and bring this phrase back.

1972: Guilt Trip

1972: Guilt Trip
Hulton-Deutsch Collection/CORBIS/Corbis via Getty Images
Hulton-Deutsch Collection/CORBIS/Corbis via Getty Images

With the rise of group and individual therapy sessions in 1972, the slang phrase “guilt trip” became popular. The phrase is kind of a passive-aggressive way to make someone feel bad about a certain situation, something some patients didn’t really know how to express before utilizing the phrase.

Of course, the phrase isn’t great because it means another party did something as a form of physiological manipulation, causing the receiver to have a guilt trip. If you ever have to use this slang phrase on another person, try this other one out for size right after: “not cool.”

1973: Carbo

1973: Carbo
Pino Grossetti/Mondadori via Getty Images
Pino Grossetti/Mondadori via Getty Images

Although the Atkins Diet isn’t founded until 1989, the diet that is low on carbs, the slang term “carbo” became popular in 1975. Short for carbohydrate, “carbo” was commonly used by athletes referring to meals, specifically “carbo-loading.” Of course, this is one of those terms that we still hear today.

Not that people go around saying “carbo” in everyday conversation, but people tend to use it while talking about meals. And while it might not be “carbo,” per se, a lot of people will drop to “o” and shorten the term to “carb” or “carbs.”

1974: Motorhead

1974: Motorhead
Bettmann/Getty Images
Bettmann/Getty Images

Kind of in the same wheelhouse as the term “biker,” “motorhead” really refers to people who enjoy long rides on their bikes, playing around in the garage, and know they look good in a leather vest.

Ironically, the slang term came out one year before the popular rock band, Motorhead. This slang term became popular with the rise of motorcycle clubs, something that was very “in the now” with veterans of the Vietnam War, before and during.

1975: Detox

1975: Detox
FREDERIC J. BROWN/AFP via Getty Images
FREDERIC J. BROWN/AFP via Getty Images

The slang term “detox” came about during the huge health scene of 1975, California. Well, we suppose that scene isn’t exactly gone, but you catch our gist. “Detoxing” was all about juicing, and not in the unhealthy narcotics type of way.

People would literally only drink specialty juices in order to lose weight. Or, at least that’s what the juice companies were promoting. Of course, the other use of the term was and still is in relation to someone going to treatment to detox their bodies of any harmful substances.

1980: Frizzy

1980: Frizzy
Ross Marino/Getty Images
Ross Marino/Getty Images

When people think of the 1980s, one thing that comes to mind is the hairstyles. With some styles contracting more static then a balloon, it’s no wonder the slang phrase “frizzy” came to be during the turn of the decade.

It became a very prominent term during the 80s, particularly when perms came into style. Ever see someone with a perm brush the curls out? Well, that style is the textbook definition of “frizzy.” But that was once the style, and history now has to live with it.

1982: Buff

1982: Buff
Harry Langdon/Getty Images
Harry Langdon/Getty Images

1982 brought with it a whole other way to describe a strong male body: “buff.” When people first watched Conan the Barbarian with Arnold Schwarzenegger, there was obviously only one way to describe him, and that word was apparently buff.

We would love to meet the person who first said the word. Seriously, did they even know what was coming out of their mouth? Or did the word buff just seem right in the context? We’re guessing the ladder, since strong just doesn’t cut it when it comes to, wait for it, all of those cut muscles.

1984: Major

1984: Major
Universal Pictures
Universal Pictures

The 1984 coming-of-age movie Sixteen Candles brought with it the talents of Molly Ringwald and the slang term “major.” Now, let us explain what this funky slang means because it doesn’t mean its actual definition of “important.” Well, it kind of does, but in a very strange way.

The word is used as slang in the film, and by the youth after seeing the film, to express their enthusiasm for something. So, if you ever hear someone calling a person or thing “major,” just know it means very, very, very, very, very good and important.