If You See This Bug, Follow These Steps ASAP!

There is one brown bug experts warn people to keep their eyes peeled for, ones that lurk in flowerbeds, grass, and cracks in the house. It might look harmless, but this pesky insect is known to be a destructive gardener.

Stay alert! If spotted, people should follow these upcoming steps.

A Tiny Brown Bug

Stink Bug In Germany
Wassilios Aswestopoulos/NurPhoto via Getty Images
Wassilios Aswestopoulos/NurPhoto via Getty Images

Insects are not always easy to spot, especially if an area is heavily wooded or there are a lot of flowers around. They tend to blend, especially if the bug happens to be tiny and brown.

Unfortunately, this is exactly what experts urge people to keep their eyes out for.

The Body Resembles A Shield

Halyomorpha halys, the brown marmorated stink bug, stink bug on a tomato
Edwin Remsburg/VW Pics via Getty Images
Edwin Remsburg/VW Pics via Getty Images

Experts urge people to keep their eyes peeled when outside because a tiny brown bug might be lingering in their yard. With six legs and a body resembling a medieval shield, this bug is unique but still tricky to spot.

Fully grown, they only reach around 0.7 inches long.

Small Does Not Mean Harmless

General View Of Nymph Of Brown Stink Bug
Daniel Hernandez-Salazar / Eyepi/Barcroft Media via Getty Images
Daniel Hernandez-Salazar / Eyepi/Barcroft Media via Getty Images

These brown critters might be tiny, but their small stature does not stop them from wreaking a whole lot of havoc if they go undetected.

That is why people need to be hyper-vigilant because these bugs walk, have wings, and can find themselves in unlikely places — like a house.

They Will Find Their Way Into The House

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James Hash/YouTube
James Hash/YouTube

These wings are not to be taken lightly. If they feel the need, these bugs will fly up and find their way into a person’s house, have it be the walls, cracks, or even the curtains.

That’s why it is so important for people to be aware if they see brown bugs around the yard.

The Brown Marmorated Stink Bug

Doug Inkley has collected thousands of stinkbugs in and around his home
Katherine Frey/The Washington Post via Getty Images
Katherine Frey/The Washington Post via Getty Images

Being hyper-aware of the insects flying around the yard is important, especially when it comes to the Halyomorpha halys, the brown marmorated stink bug.

Yes, it is a horrible name for a horrible bug that wants to do nothing more than infest gardens and homes if they are able to.

It Was Accidently Introduced To The USA In 1998

Helmeted Squash Bugs and Brown marmorated stink bug.
Jeffrey Greenberg/Universal Images Group via Getty Images
Jeffrey Greenberg/Universal Images Group via Getty Images

The brown marmorated stink bug actually originated in Asia, primarily Korea, China, and Japan. It was found in Allentown, Pennsylvania, in 1998, where scientists believe it was accidentally brought over from its home region.

Sadly, it did not take long for the stink bug to become a huge pest in the Eastern part of the United States.

Max Barclay Has An Idea Of How The Bug Traveled

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U.S. Department of Agriculture/Flickr
U.S. Department of Agriculture/Flickr

Backtracking to its origins, though, one expert believes they understand how the invasive stink bug could have made its way across various countries.

The head of the Coleoptera collection at the National History Museum, Max Barclay, believes it all comes down to the bug first finding its way over to the United Kingdom.

He Predicted They’d Arrive Back In 2014

Cloud bug
Frank Rumpenhorst/picture alliance via Getty Images
Frank Rumpenhorst/picture alliance via Getty Images

In 2014, Barclay commented, saying he believed the brown marmorated stink bug would make its way from the east to Britain and that it was “only a matter of time.”

Well, he was not wrong, as the first stink bug was spotted in the gardens of the Natural History Museum in 2020.

Shipping Crates, Pallets, And Packaging

BLG Logistics Center for Siemens
Bernd Settnik/picture alliance via Getty Images
Bernd Settnik/picture alliance via Getty Images

Sadly, that prediction also came with other bad news — the stink bugs would come, and they would not leave, establishing themselves quickly.

According to Barclay, “since stink bugs are moving indoors to hibernate during the winter, they will have arrived in shipping crates, pallets, and packaging from global trade.”

They Thrive In Warm Weather

General View Of Nymph Of Brown Stink Bug
Daniel Hernandez-Salazar / Eyepi/Barcroft Media via Getty Images
Daniel Hernandez-Salazar / Eyepi/Barcroft Media via Getty Images

These insects do not fare well in cold climates, so they make their way into the shipping crates to sleep through the chilly months, something called “diapause.” When the winter months are over, all bets are off.

Stink bugs not only love warm weather, but they tend to thrive in it.

Climate Change Is Helping The Stink Bug Invade New Areas

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Illuvis/Pixabay
Illuvis/Pixabay

With the ongoing climate change debate and the Earth getting warmer and warmer each year, humanity could be looking at a major stink bug invasion!

The International Journal of Biometeorology did research, predicting that by the 2010s, the bugs would make their way to Switzerland, making the country a new home.

They Made Their Way To Switzerland

SWITZERLAND-MOUNTAINS
FABRICE COFFRINI/AFP via Getty Images
FABRICE COFFRINI/AFP via Getty Images

Their research was correct. According to the journal, “In Switzerland, crop damage and increasing populations have been observed since 2017 and related to increasing temperatures.”

One of the specialists on the paper, Dr. Tim Haye, is an expert in the stink bug and had a few things to say in relation to the insect and climate.

It Is Bad News For The Swiss People

Brown_marmorated_stink_bug_adults
Gary Bernon/Wikimedia Commons
Gary Bernon/Wikimedia Commons

Working for the Centre for Agriculture and Biosciences International, Dr. Haye knows a think of two about invasive insects, including the stink bug. In the paper, he wrote, “There is strong evidence that climate change is already modifying species.”

“It is evident that the number of non-native species will increase and that climate change will promote their establishment. The north-western part of Switzerland could become completely suitable for H. halys.”

Higher Altitudes Aren’t Safe Either

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Brett_Hondow/Pixabay
Brett_Hondow/Pixabay

In the paper, Dr. Haye went on to explain where in Switzerland the stink bugs would infest. He said the insects would head “Southwards, the projected range expansion would reach the foothills of the Alps.”

He continued, “And higher latitudes in the alpine valleys could become suitable under future climate conditions. Monitoring the spread and population development in the north-western part of Switzerland, and higher altitudes of the valleys in the south, are recommended.”

Infestations Can Reach Into The 1,000s

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Mike Lewinski/Flickr
Mike Lewinski/Flickr

As the paper suggests, it is only a matter of time before the stink bug population really gets out of hand. So, it is important to keep those eyes peeled for any shield-shaped bug lurking around the yard and house.

There is no need for an infestation of up to 1,000 of these insects.

They Made Their Way From Pennsylvania To North Carolina

Halyomorpha halys, the brown marmorated stink bug
Edwin Remsburg/VW Pics via Getty Images
Edwin Remsburg/VW Pics via Getty Images

In the United States, though, these bugs did not make their way into the country until 1998. They spread from Pennsylvania to New Jersey and even made their way down to Virginia by 2004.

Most recently, stink bugs have made their newest home in North Carolina. But they are not just infesting the eastern seaboard.

25 Years And 44 States Later

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Oregon State University/Flickr
Oregon State University/Flickr

Unfortunately, stink bugs have not stuck to the eastern seaboard. They have unfortunately made a lot of moves and have infested a total of 44 out of the 50 states in the United States.

Amazingly, it only took these tiny bugs a short 25 years to hit all of those states.

They Smell Like Cilantro Or Almonds

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Ministry for Primary Industries/YouTube
Ministry for Primary Industries/YouTube

The stink bug got its name because of the odor it releases. While some say they smell like herbs, namely cilantro, others think they smell like almonds.

Either way, if a person starts smelling either of those items in their garden where none is growing, there is definitely an issue!

There Is No Way To Wipe Out An Invasive Species

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Gary Bernon/Wikimedia Commons
Gary Bernon/Wikimedia Commons

Sadly, there is no way to wipe out an invasive species like the stink bug. People can only contain the issue. During an interview with The Guardian, Barclay said, “[The stink bugs] establish [themselves] pretty quickly.”

“We’ve seen this in a lot of invasive species before. You find one or two, and then they are everywhere. The harlequin ladybird from China arrived in [the United Kingdom in] 2006, and now they are enormously abundant.”

Solution: Contain The Pest

Halyomorpha Halys In Greece
Wassilios Aswestopoulos/NurPhoto via Getty Images
Wassilios Aswestopoulos/NurPhoto via Getty Images

While there is no long-term solution to terminate stink bugs altogether, people can do a few things to contain the annoying situation.

From plants and crops to the walls and curtains of a house, if any shield-shaped bugs are flying around, keep these tricks in mind.

Solution One: Remove Weeds And Other Obstructions

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photoAC/pixabay
photoAC/pixabay

The first thing a person wants to do if they spot these little brown bugs is to go into the garden and pull out all of the weeds. Stink bugs love to hide within weeds and anything else that will camouflage them.

This means taking away lawn ornaments is also a good idea.

Solution Two: Homemade Repellent

Insect Repellent Spray
Smith Collection/Gado/Getty Images
Smith Collection/Gado/Getty Images

If removing weeds does not do the trick, a homemade bug repellent is a great next step. According to Gardening Know How, the best way to get rid of the unruly stink bugs is to make a homemade repellent made of kaolin clay solution (mineral clay), 15 milliliters of dish soap, and a couple of gallons of water.

Mix it all together, throw it in a spray bottle, and spray it everywhere.

The Mixture Is Harmless To Plants

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Bankim Desai/Unsplash
Bankim Desai/Unsplash

According to Gardening Know How, stink bugs will not munch on leaves, crops, or even step foot on something sprayed with that mixture. Even better, it also repeals them from laying their eggs!

The mixture is also harmless to plants and crops. Just be sure to rinse fruits and vegetables well with water before consuming.

Solution Three: A “Trap Plant”

Sunflower farm in New Jersey
Tayfun Coskun/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images
Tayfun Coskun/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images

Stink bugs are attracted to yellow flowers, such as sunflowers. So, it is a good idea to create a “trap plant” using any yellow flora. This does not mean planting a Venus flytrap near a yellow flower, though!

The idea of of “trap plant” is to guide the stink bugs away from everything else.

Plant The Trap Away From Everything

Autumn weather Sep 16th 2021
Owen Humphreys/PA Images via Getty Images
Owen Humphreys/PA Images via Getty Images

For a “trap plant” to work, a person is going to want to plant yellow flowers in a different section of the yard, far away from all of the other crops and flowers. This way, the stink bugs will congregate there, away from the garden.

From there, it is up to the person how to handle the bugs.

Next Steps: Disposing Of The Trap Plant

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Free-Photos/Pixabay
Free-Photos/Pixabay

Once the trap is planted and the stink bugs begin to congregate, it is up to the planter to decide what they would like to do. The good news is there are a few options. The first option would be to do nothing and let nature take its course.

This means literally leave the plant alone and let birds and other animals pick off the insects.

Or Dig Up The Plant And Put It In A Plastic Bag

Doug Inkley has collected thousands of stinkbugs in and around his home
Katherine Frey/The Washington Post via Getty Images
Katherine Frey/The Washington Post via Getty Images

Another option is to wait until numerous stink bugs fin their way to the trap plant. Once that happens, dig up the flower and dispose of it in a plastic garbage bag. Do not throw it away, though — they will just crawl out!

Instead, place the bag in the sun. The heat will kill the bugs in a few days.

Fruits And Vegetables Are Their Favorite

NA-STINKBUGS
Katherine Frey/The Washington Post via Getty Images
Katherine Frey/The Washington Post via Getty Images

The thing is, the smell is the least of a person’s concerns. These insects are the biggest pests, going straight for the garden.

They love to munch on fruits and vegetables and take out an entire crop if a person is not careful and does not take care of the issue.

$40 Million Worth Of Apples Was Ruined

Cotton bud showing signs of stinkbug infestation, Tifton, Georgia.
Edwin Remsberg / VWPics/Universal Images Group via Getty Images
Edwin Remsberg / VWPics/Universal Images Group via Getty Images

In 2010 alone, farmers lost around $40 million in apples solely because they did not catch the stink bug infestation in time. Instead of eating down to the core, stink bugs leave a gross-looking brown stain where they eat.

Even worse, they love grapes and can ruin entire wine supplies with their stench.

For a House, Sealants Are Key

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Mike Lewinski/Flickr/Flickr
Mike Lewinski/Flickr/Flickr

When it comes to protecting a house, the method of defense is a bit different. First, it is very important to seal each and every opening there is with a good and reliable sealant.

This way, the stink bugs do not have an opening to creep into and, ultimately, infest the house.

When All Else Fails, Use A Vacuum Cleaner

Clean windows
Jens Kalaene/picture alliance via Getty Images
Jens Kalaene/picture alliance via Getty Images

Sadly, sometimes sealant does not do the trick and stink bugs will get into a home. If this ever happens, there is no need to worry quite yet. The trick is to grab the vacuum cleaner and suck those pesky insects right up!

Just be sure to toss the vacuum bag out as soon as possible, or else their smell will linger.

It Is So Important To Keep An Eye Out For This Insect

Stink Bug In Germany
Wassilios Aswestopoulos/NurPhoto via Getty Images
Wassilios Aswestopoulos/NurPhoto via Getty Images

Whether it’s weeding, a homemade repellent, a trap flower, sealant, or vacuuming, one thing is certain — no one wants to deal with an invasive species like stink bugs.

It is so important to keep an eye out for this insect, especially before it is too late and the garden or house is infested.